MangoVine
Adventures in East Asia

Longhouse Visit Part 6 - Village Tour

On our second and last day at the Annah Rais Longhouse, Mr. Edwards took us on an hour long tour of his village. We had looked down the long bamboo verandah that runs along the length of the Longhouse and he took us beyond to other similar constructions.

Longhouse-Tour-Avenue

As we were waiting - Mr. Edwards was already greeting the next party of visitors to arrive - we found Elena at the front of his house preparing the bamboo rice for the next group of trekkers.

Longhouse-Tour-Guide-Prep

We moved our stuff out of the rooms we stayed in and I took a peek out the back of Mr/ Edwards' house, as he was having an extension put in. Apparently, visitors have been asking for air-conditioned rooms, so he's having these built in.

Longhouse-Tour-Edward-Construction

There was a trio of women bringing sacks of building supplies from just outside the village down to the building site. They carried their sacks, I think around 50kg (!) each, via a strap across the top of their head. When I saw the women, one looked young enough to be a teenager.

Longhouse-Tour-Workers-Carrying

Longhouse-Tour-Worker-Carrying

Mr. Edwards began our tour by taking us along the verandah down towards one end of the Longhouse. We saw a few other inhabitants pottering outside their houses and he introduced us to a few of them.

Longhouse-Tour-Avenue2

Annah Rais had a designated museum house, which I think was bought off the previous owner by the village in order to display the facets of Longhouse life. We popped in here to have a look. Right next to the door was a fireplace for cooking with.

Longhouse-Tour-Museum-Cooking

Longhouse-Tour-Museum-Lamp

Whilst the rest of the ground floor was devoid of any furniture, the space would have been used for other living quarters. The roof area was used for storage of grain and we all scampered up the thin ladder to take a look.

Longhouse-Tour-Museum-Floor

Soizic mixes imaginary grain.

Longhouse-Tour-Museum-Loft-Storage

Mr. Edwards shows us a Longhouse umbrella, a mat that's slipped over the head and which stretches down the back, in order to keep carried goods dry.

Longhouse-Tour-Museum-Rain-Hat

Of course, we all cram in for a picture.

Longhouse-Tour-Museum-Rain-Hat-Group

Outside one of the other houses, lies their own cooking area.

Longhouse-Tour-Cooking-Area

The bottom of one block opposite was being used to keep chickens.

Longhouse-Tour-Chicken-Pen

We popped into the village shop.

Longhouse-Tour-Kampung-Shop

Longhouse-Tour-Ryan-Soizic-Cat

Canes being dried out.

Longhouse-Tour-Drying-Cane

Longhouse-Tour-Drying-Cane-Linh-Ryan

Longhouse-Tour

At this point, we crossed a river that the Annah Rais Longhouse was built on the back of to get to another part of the village.

Longhouse-Tour-River

Longhouses were built on either side of the long, spacious verandah and some grain was laid out to dry on a mat.

Longhouse-Tour-Drying-Grain

We reached the village car park where day trippers actually begin a little tour of the village. They're usually welcomed by this pair of traditionally dressed women, who are offering some rice wine.

Longhouse-Tour-Costume

There was a sugar cane crushing machine on display nearby.

Longhouse-Tour-Crusher

Longhouse-Tour-Crusher-Ryan-Soizic

The Headhouse still exists, which also used to be the community hall where villagers gathered for meetings or to settle disputes.

Longhouse-Tour-Headhouse

Skulls from the practise of headhunting were stored here and still were.

Longhouse-Tour-Headhouse-Skulls

Longhouse-Tour-Headhouse-Room

This craftsman was turning tree trunks into furniture.

Longhouse-Tour-Carver

Soizic and Ryan surrounded a local child.

Longhouse-Tour-Soizic-Ryan-Kid

And then Soizic also had a go at crushing flower. There was a little old lady doing this, and the stick was a hefty piece of wood.

Longhouse-Tour-Flour-Crush-Soizic

Longhouse-Tour-Drying-Leaves

We ended by taking a group photo before we met our taxi for the journey back to Kuching.

Longhouse-Tour-Group-Shot


This entry posted in : Culture. Malaysian Borneo. Tourism.

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